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Bartleby - The Scrivener

RRP $15.99

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"Bartleby, the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street" (1853) is a short story by the American writer Herman Melville, first serialized anonymously in two parts in the November and December editions of Putnam's Magazine, and reprinted with minor textual alterations in his The Piazza Tales in 1856. The story of the lawyer-narrator who cannot bring himself to remove from his office the silent scrivener (save for the repeated phrase "I would prefer not to"), who neither works nor eats, has always fascinated both readers and critics. Numerous essays are published on what according to scholar Robert Milder "is unquestionably the masterpiece of the short fiction" in the Melville canon.The narrator, an elderly, unnamed Manhattan lawyer with a very comfortable business, relates the story of the strangest man he has ever known: Bartleby. At the start of his chronicle, the lawyer already employs two scriveners to copy legal documents by hand: Nippers and Turkey. An increase in business leads him to advertise for a third, and he hires the forlorn-looking Bartleby in the hope that his calmness will soothe the irascible temperaments of the other two.At first, Bartleby produces a large volume of high-quality work. But one day, when asked to help proofread a document, Bartleby answers with what soon becomes his perpetual response to every request-"I would prefer not to." To the dismay of the lawyer and to the irritation of the other employees, Bartleby performs fewer and fewer tasks, and eventually none. The narrator makes several futile attempts to reason with him and to learn something about him; and when he stops by the office unexpectedly, he discovers that Bartleby has started living there.Tension builds as business associates wonder why Bartleby is always there. Sensing the threat of ruined reputation but emotionally unable to evict Bartleby, the narrator finally decides to move out himself. Soon the new tenants come to ask for help: Bartleby still will not leave-he now sits on the stairs all day and sleeps in the building's doorway. The narrator visits him and attempts to reason with him, and surprises even himself by inviting Bartleby to come live with him. But Bartleby "would prefer not to." Later the narrator returns to find that Bartleby has been forcibly removed and imprisoned in The Tombs. The narrator visits him. Finding Bartleby even glummer than usual, he bribes a turnkey to make sure Bartleby gets enough food. But when he returns a few days later, he discovers that Bartleby has died of starvation, having apparently preferred not to eat.Some time afterward, the narrator hears a rumor that Bartleby had worked in a dead letter office, and reflects that dead letters would have made anyone of Bartleby's temperament sink into an even darker gloom. The story closes with the narrator's resigned and pained sigh, "Ah Bartleby! Ah humanity!"


Bartleby, The Scrivener

RRP $18.99

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Bartleby the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street is a short story by Herman Melville, published anonymously in 1853 in Putnam's Monthly Magazine. It was collected in his 1856 volume The Piazza Tales. Herman Melville wrote this story in 1853, two years after Moby Dick had been published and his writing career was beginning to lose its luster. Subtitled, "A Story of Wall Street," it is a seemingly simple story about a lawyer who hires a gentleman named Bartleby as a scrivener in his office. This was way back in the days before photocopy machines and scriveners performed the necessary tasks of tediously hand copying documents over and over. Bartleby was good at the copying part of his job, but when asked to proofread aloud one day he simply replied, "I prefer not to." From that moment forward, he used the phrase "I prefer not to" for every task requested of him, eventually "preferring not to" do any work whatsoever. The lawyer, who is astounded by Bartleby's attitude, tells the story in the first person. The story is rich in language and yet spare in actual action. The reader is forced to think, and think seriously about the choices we make daily. Bartleby chose to rebel and become an anti-hero. But the real protagonist of the story is the lawyer, who is drawn into Bartleby's power and grows to admire him. The conclusion is sad, but inevitable.


A Storm Of Swords : Part 1

RRP $22.99

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‘All men are fools, if truth be told, but the ones in motley are more amusing than the ones with crowns ’The Seven Kingdoms are divided by revolt and blood feud. In the northern wastes, a savage horde is poised to invade the Kingdom of the North where Robb Stark wears his new-forged crown. Throughout Westeros, the war for the Iron Throne rages more fiercely than ever, but if the Wall is breached, no king will live to claim it.


Wallflowers Need Not Apply

RRP $149.99

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Straightforward advice on navigating the business and craft of screenwriting. John Russell is the pen name of a screenwriter with nearly 20 years of professional experience, and he's probably responsible for the following quotes: "I wish people would read a book like Wallflowers before approaching me with their 'screenplays.' " - Anonymous Producer "Not everyone can become a successful screenwriter. But if you think you have the stuff, Russell offers you practical advice in an entertaining 'life coach' kick-in-the-pants style." - Unnamed Writer "This dude writes all the things I wish I could say in my books." - Screenwriting Expert


The Art Of Grief

RRP $503.99

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Art and other expressive therapies are increasingly used in grief counseling, not only among children and adolescents, but throughout the developmental spectrum. Creative activities are commonly used in group and individual psychotherapy programs, but it is only relatively recently that these expressive modalities have been employed within the context of clinical grief work in structured settings. These forms of nonverbal communication are often more natural ways to express thoughts and feelings that are difficult to discuss, particularly when it comes to issues surrounding grief and loss. Packed with pictures and instructional detail, this book includes an eight-session curriculum for use with grief support groups as well as alternative modalities of grief art therapy.

 

 



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